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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
? >> you have a great number of things. stories about the economy and about the foreign policy cash, etc.. what prompted me to write spin masters though was the benghazi attack. it became clear that the political news media rather than focusing on a story of foreign policy failures and the president had promised fy failing to produce eight said it significantly destroyed al qaeda and here we see the terrorists acting out. romney didn't feel that situation that well with his press conference he called it at the wrong time about the guy that runs the entire foreign policy apparatus in the united states. it really does seem he used to say that a reporter is someone else that will sell his soul for a good story but it took turns out when the story might make barack obama look bad or make his presidency looks like a failure they are going to miss stories by definition simply for the inability to see the failure to be interested .... on the editorial page recovered the way that i wanted to be covered if i have anyone to blame but myself. we are part of who we are as the washington examiner but
-- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. and on foreign policy, they did not support the bush foreign policy, so the issues that made that republican party dominant, all three issues are in democratic favor. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter what network you have. economic conservatives and smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are weighing right now are do we need better data bases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you look at the gay marriage issue, that is very generational
-american. they are rational and we marched off in to the two foreign-policy debacles of the 20th and early 21st century. robert mcnamara, secretary of defense 30 years later spoke of his regret that we have been able to listen. he said it was a failure of the imagination to realize a french are the best informed westerners on vietnam and we didn't take them seriously because we send to didn't have an interest. as the book recounts, i would to the french archives to look at what was going on in the french foreign ministry. they have no culture in their insignificant. but they said as they analyze intelligence from vietnam 17,000 french citizens they are. exiles in paris and they try to share with us. we couldn't here because it is confusing concept we have. >> host: professor friedman a month of been times in there's another anti-nation type feelings? anti-british empire come anti-roman empire? >> guest: indeed. does the right question to ask because it should be to the use of the term we have in the court age of the british empire. perdition officials talk about anglo phobia to explain why they encount
and deficit thing. another is that i think the republican party has to make clear what its foreign policy is. it has had two wars for the past 12 years, people are still settling in and thinking, the voters have said, we don't like that. we're not for that. the republican party has to make clear what it stands for and it is going to have a little bit of debate to get there. those two big things and the policies that spring from them will make all of the difference, so will an eventual compelling presidential candidate. somebody who is involved right now. at the end of the day, it's the candidates who resolve a lot of unresolved things by taking a stand and speaking forcefully for it. >> that was bill clinton after walter mondale lost it. after jimmy carter lost. we had a dynamic governor who was reformed minded and brought those issues into the national forefront. he really helped recharge the democratic party. you know, the republican party is out to lunch. i watched cpac, karl. karl was a former friend. >> i thought i was a current friend? >> you're always a friend, you owe me some chili.
big dinners as secretary of state, in addition to all of the foreign policy personalities, there were always a few big donors who were sprinkled in and they won't forget it when it comes time in 2015 to begin. chris: hosting a show from berlin, from germany, another event given at the state department with her supporters and the obama supporters was at the white house, you're right. >> she is good at keeping that large group of people who would support her campaign involved, interested, and potentially ready to go. chris: anybody think she is not running? that's it, you just heard it, when we come back, "scoops and [ boy 1 ] hey! that's the last crescent. oh, did you want it? yea we'll split it. [ female announcer ] made fresh, so light, buttery and flakey. that's half that's not half! guys, i have more! thanks mom [ female announcer ] pillsbury crescents. let the making begin here's a better idea. pillsbury grands! flaky layers biscuits in just 15 minutes the light delicate layers add a layer of warmth to your next dinner. pillsbury grands biscuits let the making begin. chris: welcom
started the center back in 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back then asian security was all about what's happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, study of the soviet union might have made a lot more sense. dick and i, as we talked it through, talked about the potential that someday it might even be conceivable that u.s. trade with asia would actually even equal our trade with what was going on across the atlantic. today, it's much greater than our trade across the atlantic. we have been blessed by the insights of many dear friends in asia. we have over the years seen the remarkable economic growth and economic development in asia. it's been our very great pleasure, in fact, to recognize that in terms of economic freedom, as it has evolved throughout asia in specific countries and indeed throughout the region. we always knew that our good friends in japan and that the u.s.japan mutual relationship, both the mutual defense treaty and our bilateral general relationship would be central. but we also thought that asia des
's good to get away from congress. >> we'll get insight on what comes next from our foreign policy experts, including abc news global affairs correspondent christiane amanpour and jeffrey goldberg. >>> hello again. you're going to see president obama touching down at andrews air force late last night after his first trip to israel as president. we'll analyze the mission and what comes next for that volatile region later in the program. >>> but, first, the debates that president obama is returning to here at home. and for that, a "this week" first, jim messina and karl rove join our powerhouse roundtable. welcome to both of you, along with donna brazile, peggy noonan and "nightline" anchor terry moran. karl, let me begin with you, 5:00 a.m., the senate passes a budget. the house has already passed a budget. very stark differences between the two, everyone waiting for president obama to weigh in on this. i guess my question to you is, despite those stark differences, do you see this as the beginning of negotiations toward a compromise? >> i frankly take this as a constructive sign. it gives
beginning that barack obama's the most controlling foreign policy president since richard nixon. hillary clinton was given very true truly cons quential issues to manage. kerry may be in a better situation because it's legacy time and obama is trying to figure out what do todo on the domestic side. he might turn john kerry, who is quite capable, into a manager in chief on the israeli/palestinian issue. >> jamie: let me focus on that. what is realistic, aaron? the palestinians want settlement building to stop. benjamin netanyahu says no. can we ever get them to the table with preconditions? >> no, not with preconditions. i think the president really dodged the one headache he created for himself in the first term, when was to demand a comprehensive settlement freeze, which no israeli prime minister would agree. to so i think you will not see a resumption of formal negotiations. you will see quiet contacts between the israelis and palestinians and a lot of frequent flyer miles for john kerry, having separate conversations with the israelis and the palestinians to see whether or not there i
of state are her heren washington where i cover foreign policy. that supported me to write "the secretary," to take a step back and digest everything i had seen. every i've learned. i learned a lot, being in this front row seat to history, to diplomacy. watching all those different events unfold. and writing the book was a very maturing experience as well as i digested as you say some of what i've seen come and try to come to some conclusions that i was trying to get at. but when it comes to the sickest and people around her, i think that what i found striking is her ability to stay focused at all times as much as possible on what is happening. she doesn't get distracted by the details if they're not important. details often met her but she has an ability to stay focused on the big picture. how is what's happening in afghanistan impacting what they might be doing in the middle east? how is the middle east impact you what to do in asia? i think she could sense of what is the big picture. what is the strategy? and, of course, she's around by people who are helping her. i had the tournament
the key. i think there are people who would like a less aggressive foreign policy. there are all kinds of issues that don't neatly fit in the left/right paradigm that i think would help because we are not the doing well in a lot of the purple and blue states so we do need a candidate that would appeal across the left/right paradigm. >> chris: we have about 30 seconds left. your budget which would balance the budget your plan would balance the budget in five years. paul ryan's which has come under attack for balancing it in ten years. you introduced it three consecutive years if and the most votes was this weekend when you got 18. isn't that out o of the mainstream? >> the thing is i think the legislature is ten years pee the public.behind i introduced a bill to quit sending money to egypt. 9 o percent of americans agree with me and 80% of the senators disagree with me. i would argue that the senate is not up-to-date on what the people really want chris thank you for joining us and always good to talk with you, sir. >> thank you. >> chris: up next, the supreme court will hear two cases
away the key. so, i think there are people who would like a less aggressive foreign policy and there are all kinds of issues that don't neatly left in the left-right paradigm that i think would help, because we're not doing very well in a lot of these states, purple and blue states and we need a candidate that would appeal across the left-right paradigm. >> chris: briefly, 30 seconds left, though. your budget which would balance the budget, your plan, would balance the budget in five years, paul ryan's which has come under attack for balancing it in ten years, you have introduced it three consecutive years in the senate, the most votes you got was this weekend when you got 18 of 100 senators, isn't it out of the mainstream? >> well, the thing is, i think the legislature is about ten years behind the public. for example, i have introduced amendments to quit sending money to egypt and build bridges here in the the united states instead of in egypt. and i bet you 90% of the american people agree with me but 80% of my senators disagree. i argue the senate is not up-to-date with
-americanism. but ignored foreign opinions. they are rational but marched off into the two foreign policy debacles of the early 21st century. there's a problem. robert mcnamara who orchestrated the escalation in vietnam 30 years later spoke of his regret that we hadn't been able to listen. he said was a failure of the imagination to realize the french are the best informed westerners in vietnam and we didn't take them seriously because we assumed they just it in for us. as the book recounts, and went to the records of the event. i went to the french archives and they weren't writing americans. they have no closer and there is significant. but they said was they analyzed the intelligence from vietnam. the vietnamese exiles are concentrated areas. they had a lot of good information and try to share with us. they tried to help and we couldn't hear because of the confusing concept we have. >> host: professor friedman, have there been times with the other anti-nation type feelings can anti-british empire, anti-roman empire. >> that's the right question to us because it should lead to the use of the ter
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
is the foreign policy if not the military role of your brand in china in areas like socom. have you noticed that unity, not military, diplomatic, economic activity that both these countries quick >> the short answer is absolutely. to put a little meat on a bone, one of the things i'm supposed to be doing is making sure the united states rants apart archers of latin america. the partnership is a too late thing i you'd agree that it's very one-way now and they very much want the united states in their lives the exception of the two or three or four of them very much want the united states and allies. so we have great trading relationships, great military to military contact, but when you have an organization like the chinese come in the economically powerful, spending money, whether they're increasing infrastructure that pours, panama canal are buying everything that they want and large, large quantities. the partnership with china is very strong. they do the best they can to establish milk to build partnerships and they do pretty well on that. so that's china. on the arabian side, we've seen
received praise from mitt romney's former chief foreign policy adviser on his commitment to containing the iranian nuclear program. take a listen. >> what he said in israel is, we will do everything we need to do and containment won't work. it's not a policy preference, it will not work. in a sense the president was taking on his own at home, saying containing an iran nuclear program is unworkable. and for him to say that in israel, on the ground, standing with the israeli prime minister was a powerful statement. so i think it had the effect of reassuring the prime minister. >>> and with the defense of marriage act and proposition 8 both going before the supreme court this week, it was a hot topic on many of the sunday morning shows. former adviser to president george w. bush, karl rove, was asked about gay rights and the future of the republican party on abc this morning. take a listen to what he said. >> can you imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying, flat-out, i am for gay marriage? >> i could. >> the debate over gun control was reinvigorated today, by
at eastern on c-span and c-span3, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> now, the house foreign committee affairs allied u.s. policy toward the asia pacific region and of relations with china. he talks about north korea's's nuclear program, trade agreements, and india's role in the region. from the heritage foundation, this is about one hour. >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. days, thext 13 president of the heritage foundation. i am delighted to have with us as amorning my successor new president, senator jim demint. we're happy you are here to join us. to theme all of you auditorium. it's good to see so many friends here and particularly a happy occasion for us to be able to co-host the reception afterward with the ambassador of the the republic of korea. it's very special time for korea to celebrate the first anniversary of chorus and we celebrate and commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of the korean war. today, we have a number of other significant guests who are here with us representing the samsung company from their new jersey headquarters, mr. m.j. han and welcome you here on
. >> we all no asia is on the rise. he served as singapore's foreign secretary and the dean of the country's school of public policy. he has a new book out "the great convergence, asia, the west and the logic of one world." welcome back. you start the book with good news. since everybody in the united states and the west has been feeling blue, tell us what the good news is with and why we should be happy. >> actually i'm surprised by the kind of level of posseessimism europe and america. the world has never been in better shape if you look at the view. the number was dying in dying in conflicts is the lowest it has ever been. in term of global poverty the only u.n. goal is having more than having by 2015. and the middle class, and this is a really stunning news, if you look at where asia is today, they are 500 million people living in middle-class living standards today in 2013 in asia. by 2020, which is seven years in now, the number will explode from 500 million to 1.75 billion. an increase of 3.5 times in seven years. we've never seen this before in human history. that's going to change
there is a lot of attention but it is not so much appreciate treat those foreigners well but just in terms of power do we achieve our goals? by acting unilaterally or with coalitions of different countries of force multipliers to ensure we have helped to pursue our goals and the policies we decide upon are well thought out. in 2002 with the dispute over the iraq war president of france urged americans not to go to war with iraq. he said don't go there i fought in algeria this will end up badly you'll be seen as an occupation and this will not be in your interest. what did we do? lee said the french are anti-american, they resent there star is falling so we poured french wine into the gutter and renamed the french fries as free of rise that we should dig up the boys from normandy because it is no longer a resting place and there was demonstrations what is this wave of anti-americanism? i thought that reminds me of the early '60s when the president of france charles de gaulle told the kennedy administration don't go to war in vietnam. we have been there and we know the terrain. he said this
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)